How you met your Ewha Voice 1
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How you met your Ewha Voice 1
  • Oh Yoon
  • 승인 2011.02.25 22:37
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  No one knows when the meeting will end since there can be hours of heated discussion to pick the perfect news materials to publish the best newspaper. Monday meetings are the starting points of all Ewha Voice papers.
  As the saying goes, “No pains, no gains;”bringing good news materials takes many challenging hours for the reporters.
  “When I was a cub reporter, I would Google ‘Ewha Womans’ University’ and go through dozens of pages, browsing for news items,” said Shim Su-min (Economics, 3), an assistant editor at the Ewha Voice.
  Reporters habitually “brainstorm” using their own campus lives as the basis of enjoyable news stories.
  “Even when I am eating tuna gimbab at Ewha Sarang with my friends, I map out an article about the Ewha Sarang tuna gimbab,”Shim said.
  “Now I have a whole new perspective on the Ewha campus.”
Established on June 4, 1954, as the first English-language university newspaper in Korea, the Ewha Voice has continued serving as a trusted source of on-campus information and with highly qualified journalism among university English newspapers. In this page, the Ewha Voice wants to introduce how it established itself as bi-weekly newspaper and describe the reporters’ intense schedule in working for the Ewha Voice.

Look around and take a pick: item meetings
  Every other Monday at 6:30 p.m. reporters,editors and a faculty advisor for the Ewha Voice gather around at a long table in the Ewha Voice office, Room B211 in the Ewha Campus Complex (ECC).

  No one knows when the meeting will end since there can be hours of heated discussion to pick the perfect news materials to publish the best newspaper. Monday meetings are the starting points of all Ewha Voice papers.
  As the saying goes, “No pains, no gains;”bringing good news materials takes many challenging hours for the reporters.
  “When I was a cub reporter, I would Google ‘Ewha Womans’ University’ and go through dozens of pages, browsing for news items,” said Shim Su-min (Economics, 3), an assistant editor at the Ewha Voice.
  Reporters habitually “brainstorm” using their own campus lives as the basis of enjoyable news stories.
  “Even when I am eating tuna gimbab at Ewha Sarang with my friends, I map out an article about the Ewha Sarang tuna gimbab,”Shim said.
  “Now I have a whole new perspective on the Ewha campus.”


Clocks ticking and fingers tapping: Covering and writing
  Once the news materials are decided upon in the meeting, the reporters collect information and make interviews for the articles. As student reporters, the biggest challenge for them is balancing the Ewha Voice and academic schedules.

  “Luckily, the Ewha Voice does not run during the exam period but still, when assignments and article deadlines tangle together, it is a fiasco,” said Kim Jin-ah (Economics, 2), a staff reporter.
  The reporters also have to schedule with photographers for the article pictures. Since only two photographers choose the photos for the Ewha Voice, their schedule is quite tight.

  “I had to take pictures of the opening ceremony of the art wall at the Main Gate. The ceremony was held between my breaks so I had to run the across from the Ewha-POSCO Building to the Main Gate to the Hak-gwan,” said One of the Ewha Voice photographers, Ann Ye-dam (Broadcasting and Film, 2).
  When interview articles are given, contacting the interviewee is also an arduous task for the reporters. For staff reporter Park Se-ra (English, 3), contacting Chun Shin-ae (’64, English Literature), a U.S. government appointee who was published last May, was memorable experience.

  “I had to call, write to and visit countless agencies and organizations to ask her for the interview,” Park said.
  Having finished the research, reporters then have to write articles by the appropriate deadline. The first draft has to come out no later than Thursday at 5:00 p.m. the same week. Deadlines are the life and essence of the newsroom, which has to be kept in every situation.
  “If a reporter is five minutes late turning in an article, it creates a 20 minutes delay to the editors and those small delays can add up to an hour delay in publishing,” said Park Ra-kyung (Business, 3), the Editor-in-Chief of the Ewha Voice.

Cut and paste: Editing, designing and printing out
  The round-the-week efforts of reporters are edited twice by the senior reporters and student editors; editing articles is another work that takes time.
  “Editing actually takes more time and effort than writing my own article,” said Namkung Yoon (English, 3), an assistant editor at the Ewha Voice. “After going through sleepless nights with other editors discussing about editing, I adored the Ewha Voice even more.”
  Final copies are then sent to the copyeditors who are native English-language professors at Ewha. The copyeditors pick out the best fit expressions and catch grammatical mistakes.“It depends on the article, but normally, it takes about 40 minutes to an hour to edit an article,” said professor John Carpenter (Journalism), one of the Ewha
Voice copyeditors.
  The finished articles are then fit into the layout designs, taking another four to five days, using the Adobe InDesign program. The Editor-in-Chief, the Managing Editor and couple of other editors and reporters sometimes stay overnight in the ECC Reporting Room to put the articles together into the newspaper.
  “It is tiresome. But being alone with the reporters in the empty ECC is something no one can quite experience. Plus, it is extraordinary to see the completed result before anyone else,” said editor Shim.
  The designing has to be completed no later than Friday 12:00 p.m. so they can be sent off to the printer’s and be printed out.
  The two-week work of all Ewha Voice members are all condensed onto the paper, which is distributed throughout the campus on every other Monday mornings. The finished product fresh from the bun is now in your hands.


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