Updated : 2017.9.23 Sat 14:13
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Fighting for equal rights of all sexual orientations 1
Movements to empower the LGBT community
2017년 09월 07일 (목) 11:54:35 Ewha Voice evoice@ewha.ac.kr

The planned constitutional revision changed in wording from “equal rights of the two sexes” to “all genders,” which includes 50 different definitions of sexuality. Legalizing same-sex marriage struck a controversy during the presidential elections this May as well. 
“I oppose discrimination against homosexuals, but I am against the legalization of gay marriage,” President Moon claimed during his campaign, angering supporters and members of the LGBT community. 
There are currently over 300 organizations, varying from professors and parents to conservative organizations opposing homosexuality and same-sex marriage. Their main concern is of the confusion that the new legislation may bring to society. They claim that equalizing the treatment of all sexualities will entail changes in public bathrooms, adoption processes, and the legal definition of marriage.
Nevertheless, many still believe that it is a process that society must go through eventually.
“I do agree that the planned constitutional reform will bring about confusion, but I also believe that it is a process worth going through,” said a student majoring in sociology. “Accepting sexual minorities will be a necessity in the near future and there is no reason to put it aside just because some people can’t tolerate the sexual orientation of others.”

The constitutional revision of same-sex marriage

The planned constitutional revision changed in wording from “equal rights of the two sexes” to “all genders,” which includes 50 different definitions of sexuality. Legalizing same-sex marriage struck a controversy during the presidential elections this May as well. 
“I oppose discrimination against homosexuals, but I am against the legalization of gay marriage,” President Moon claimed during his campaign, angering supporters and members of the LGBT community. 
There are currently over 300 organizations, varying from professors and parents to conservative organizations opposing homosexuality and same-sex marriage. Their main concern is of the confusion that the new legislation may bring to society. They claim that equalizing the treatment of all sexualities will entail changes in public bathrooms, adoption processes, and the legal definition of marriage.
Nevertheless, many still believe that it is a process that society must go through eventually.
“I do agree that the planned constitutional reform will bring about confusion, but I also believe that it is a process worth going through,” said a student majoring in sociology. “Accepting sexual minorities will be a necessity in the near future and there is no reason to put it aside just because some people can’t tolerate the sexual orientation of others.”

 

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