Life at Wellesley and beyond
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Life at Wellesley and beyond
  • Ewha Voice
  • 승인 2011.02.26 12:29
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  When you hear the word “Wellesley College”, what image pops up to you? Is it an image of ambitious women like Hilary Clinton or Madeleine Albright studying all night in library? Perhaps it might be an image of Julia Roberts telling an inspirational story not to be limited by the gender.
  Before coming to Wellesley College, I thought going to Wellesley College meant challenging my academic skill infinitely. It turns out that it is so much more than that. It is a combination of academic challenge melted with friendship bonded in the name of “Wellesley sisterhood” and freedom to choose our path of life.
  The class consists of usually no more than 30 students, average 15 students. With limited numbers of students, we become friends to each other quite easily. After two weeks, I became friends with a student sitting next to me.
Moreover, students here come from such diverse locations that I am continuously opening my eyes to the new cultures. Friends I’ve made here come from everywhere including Egypt, Argentina, Kenya, and Hong Kong. This is not surprising since Wellesley has been recognized as the “top four for ethnic diversity among private liberal arts colleges,” according to US News & World Report.
  But it’s not just the friends that excite me. It’s the spirit of liberal ideas uncontested by the limits met in conservatism. The idea of “we are free to do what we want” is very much embedded in Wellesley. The fact that students are allowed to speak freely in the class validates my point. Also, unlike many other colleges, attendance is not forced upon students in grades by calling out the names in class.
  Despite such freedom, all students choose to come to class because lectures are very much engaging. The method of teaching varies, but in essence there is a huge emphasis on speaking up what we know through lively discussion. Such discussion gives us a chance to think beyond the materials in book.
  I have three months left. I bet it will be the quickest three months that I ever experienced. I’m already missing the place where I grew to love, and will love.
  Searching for a flight ticket, doing a little research about attractions in the city, and budgeting for the trip. Each city has different atmosphere, different buildings, and different people, which refreshed whenever I got back from the trip.

  When you hear the word “Wellesley College”, what image pops up to you? Is it an image of ambitious women like Hilary Clinton or Madeleine Albright studying all night in library? Perhaps it might be an image of Julia Roberts telling an inspirational story not to be limited by the gender.   Before coming to Wellesley College, I thought going to Wellesley College meant challenging my academic skill infinitely. It turns out that it is so much more than that. It is a combination of academic challenge melted with friendship bonded in the name of “Wellesley sisterhood” and freedom to choose our path of life.  The class consists of usually no more than 30 students, average 15 students. With limited numbers of students, we become friends to each other quite easily. After two weeks, I became friends with a student sitting next to me. Moreover, students here come from such diverse locations that I am continuously opening my eyes to the new cultures. Friends I’ve made here come from everywhere including Egypt, Argentina, Kenya, and Hong Kong. This is not surprising since Wellesley has been recognized as the “top four for ethnic diversity among private liberal arts colleges,” according to US News & World Report.  But it’s not just the friends that excite me. It’s the spirit of liberal ideas uncontested by the limits met in conservatism. The idea of “we are free to do what we want” is very much embedded in Wellesley. The fact that students are allowed to speak freely in the class validates my point. Also, unlike many other colleges, attendance is not forced upon students in grades by calling out the names in class.   Despite such freedom, all students choose to come to class because lectures are very much engaging. The method of teaching varies, but in essence there is a huge emphasis on speaking up what we know through lively discussion. Such discussion gives us a chance to think beyond the materials in book.  I have three months left. I bet it will be the quickest three months that I ever experienced. I’m already missing the place where I grew to love, and will love.   Searching for a flight ticket, doing a little research about attractions in the city, and budgeting for the trip. Each city has different atmosphere, different buildings, and different people, which refreshed whenever I got back from the trip.

 

Huh Soo-jin (International Studies, 3) is currently studying at Wellesley College in Massachusetts.


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