“In Video Journalism, the camera does most of the talking”
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“In Video Journalism, the camera does most of the talking”
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  • 승인 2010.10.18 14:39
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Kyeong Tae-song (Television & Film, 3) was the prize winner for two consecutive years of the Korea Broadcasting System Youth VJ Contest, a contest that every student interested in making visual images dreams to win once in their college life.
 Visual images can sometimes be more effective and powerful in delivering thoughts and experiences than written down documents or speeches. Nowadays, visual media make up a large portion in our lives with the help of technology and many people are interested in creating their own User Created Contents. For the past few years, contests related to this area have appealed to many university students and Video Journalism (VJ) has been a specific field of interest.

 

 Kyeong Tae-song (Television & Film, 3) has been the prize winner for two consecutive years of the Korea Broadcasting System (KBS) Youth VJ Contest, a contest that every student interested in making visual images desires to win a prize once in their college life. It consists of two parts, the preliminary part and the final part. Participants make one VJ work for the preliminary one and finalists have to improve their works by applying what they have learned from a training camp supported by KBS and Samsung.

 Kyeong won the prize twice in 2008, as a team with three other students, and in 2009, as an individual. Her years at an animation high school and a Broadcasting and Film major at Ewha became the background to participate.

The Musician of the Street is a human documentary about a street musician in Gwangjang Market.

 

 “The courses I took at Ewha motivated me to enter the VJ contest. I used what I learned from lectures and receive critiques from professors,” said Kyeong. “During the camp for finalists, I learned more about VJ theoretically and pratically by meeting real KBS cameramen and directors.”

 Kyeong pointed out sincerity and honesty as elements of her success in the VJ contest. She said that she wanted to pull out the humane and deep-from-the-heart stories with her video camera.

 The first video that Kyeong and her other teammates made was a human documentary of a man selling sushi for his living and donating all of his money to the poor. The man was poor himself but happy selling sushi at his old truck, using only the fish that he bought from the early morning fish market. Kyeong and the others wanted to deliver his modesty and warm-heartedness through the short video and succeeded in doing so.

 The Musician of the Street, the name of Kyeong’s individual second video work, was also a human documentary. It was about an old man playing his saxophone in the streets of Gwangjang Market, located at Jongno-gu. He was also known for his warm-heartedness in making others happy by giving free saxophone performances to the poor.

 “Everyone who has been to Gwangjang Market must have seen him singing his saxophone in a weird-looking black suit and hat. It was fun to follow him for about seven days and observe his life,” said Kyeong.

 Kyeong emphasized that those willing to participate in this contest should make good use of the approximate 10 minutes of what they want to show to the judges. The beginning part of the work should be most eye-catching and consistently getting opinions from others is necessary because they can be objective audiences to evaluate the work.

 The subject matter of a VJ work should be something unusual and sometimes peculiar. However, it still needs to be sincere and honest for the audience to sympathize.

 “Participating in VJ contests can be a meaningful opportunity to all students even though they do not major in Broadcasting and Film. Just look for the vision it has on your future and go for it once in your college life,” said Kyeong.


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